• Janine di Giovanni est la plus grande reporter de guerre de sa génération. Bosnie, Somalie, Rwanda, Sierra Léone, Libéria, Kosovo, Gaza, Cisjordanie, Timor oriental, Tchétchénie, Irak, Afghanistan ... Elle aura tout couvert. Les récits qu'elle a recueillis depuis les débuts du conflit en Syrie donnent la parole à celles et ceux qui vivent la guerre au quotidien. Ils racontent l'un des coflits les plus brutaux et les plus fraticides de l'Histoire. Dans la tradition de Ryszard Kapuscinski et plus récemment de Svetlana Alexievitch, "Le jour où ils frappèrent à notre porte" témoigne de l'incroyable résilience humaine au nihilisme et à la volonté de destruction de la dignité.

  • Winner of the Hay Festival Award for Prose Winner of the 2016 IWMF Courage in Journalism Award Shortlisted for the New York Public Library's Helen Bernstein Excellence in Journalism Award Shortlisted for the 2017 Moore Prize for Non-Fiction Literature In May of 2012, Janine di Giovanni travelled to Syria, marking the beginning of a long relationship with the country, as she began reporting from both sides of the conflict, witnessing its descent into one of the most brutal, internecine conflicts in recent history. Drawn to the stories of ordinary people caught up in the fighting, Syria came to consume her every moment, her every emotion.

    Speaking to those directly involved in the war, di Giovanni relays the personal stories of rebel fighters thrown in jail at the least provocation; of children and families forced to watch loved ones taken and killed by regime forces with dubious justifications; and the stories of the elite, holding pool parties in Damascus hotels, trying to deny the human consequences of the nearby shelling.

    Delivered with passion, fearlessness and sensitivity, The Morning They Came for Us is an unflinching account of a nation on the brink of disintegration, charting an apocalyptic but at times tender story of life in a jihadist war - and an unforgettable testament to human resilience in the face of devastating, unimaginable horrors.

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