Paul Holberton

  • The Dresden Kupferstich-Kabinett (Museum of Prints, Drawings and Photographs of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden), which has one of the greatest collections of prints and drawings in Europe, has particularly important and unique holdings of the work of the outstanding German graphic artist Käthe Kollwitz (1867-1945). Kollwitz formed a long association with Max Lehrs (1855-1938), a leading art historian and then the director of the Dresden Kupferstich-Kabinett, and Lehrs became Kollwitz's discerning supporter.
    From 1898 Lehrs began buying Kollwitz's work systematically - which, in the Germany of Kaiser Wilhelm II, was a remarkable thing for a man in his position to do, considering that she was a woman artist with marked socialist leanings. Indeed the fi rst work he purchased for the Dresden Museum was her provocative cycle entitled The Weavers' Revolt. Lehrs went on to purchase more than 200 works for the Kupferstich-Kabinett, taking care to document their evolution. The Kupferstich-Kabinett holds a rich correspondence between Lehrs and the artist, which has been newly researched and analysed. Since Lehrs collected contemporary graphic art internationally - for example Whistler, Munch and Toulouse- Lautrec - the signifi cance he attached to Kollwitz's work is all the more telling: this renowned print scholar called her «one the greatest talents in the fi eld of the graphic arts».
    The exhibition - and especially the catalogue - tell the circumstances and story of the earliest public holding of Kollwitz's work to be established and of Kollwitz's full development of her major themes - of war and death, of motherhood and love, and not least of self-portraiture, one of the most fascinating aspects of her oeuvre.
    This relationship between artist and curator was and is exemplary for its time and our time, while the historical perspective and contextualization of these newly re-examined and freshly assessed works reveals new aspects of the artist, who should be much better known in the English-speaking world.

  • Painting childhood

    Collectif

    Children have always fascinated artists and Painting Childhood will explore some of the most iconic paintings of children produced over the past 500 years. Featuring stunning portraits, amusing genre scenes and touching 'fancy pictures', the book will examine both the creative process and the specifi c challenges posed by painting children: from how to capture the fl eeting moments of youth to how to encourage young subjects to sit still.
    Accompanying the exhibitions Painting Childhood: From Holbein to Freud and Childhood Now, the book will discuss a wealth of masterpieces from British collections by artists including Hans Holbein the Younger, Anthony van Dyck, Jan Steen, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, William Hogarth, Joshua Reynolds, Thomas Gainsborough, Johan Zoff any and John Everett Millais. These iconic paintings will be considered alongside the preparatory sketches that were made for them and the works that were made after them in an exploration of the creative process and the artistic 'conversations' that occurred throughout the centuries.
    Painting Childhood will also explore 'intimate portraits' - artist's portrayals of their own children. Paintings, sketches and sculptures by Stanley Spencer, Louise Bourgeois, Jacob Epstein and Lucian Freud, among others, present highly personal insights into the place of family within an artist's life, and the ongoing dialogue between biography and creativity.
    This theme extends to the present day, and the work of three contemporary fi gurative painters - Chantal Joff e, Mark Fairnington and Matthew Krishanu. Drawn to children as subjects, each of these London-based artists depict childhood in very diff erent ways.
    Together, they provide fresh perspectives on what constitutes childhood today and reaffi rm the place of painting as a diverse and powerful artistic practice.

  • One of the fi nest collections of Impressionism anywhere in the world was assembled by the English industrialist and philanthropist Samuel Courtauld (1876-1947).
    During the 1920s, Courtauld acquired seminal works by all of the major Impressionists, from Renoir's early masterpiece La Loge to Manet's last great work, A Bar at the Folies-Bergère. His collection grew to include such iconic works as Gauguin's great Tahitian nude Nevermore and one of Van Gogh's most famous paintings, Self- Portrait with Bandaged Ear. Courtauld was particularly devoted to Cézanne and put together the largest collection of his work in the United Kingdom, including the epic Montagne Sainte-Victoire with Large Pine and one of the celebrated Card Players. After a decade of collecting, Courtauld gave the majority of these remarkable works to establish The Courtauld Institute of Art and Gallery in London.
    This will be the fi rst time that Samuel Courtauld's collection has been shown in Paris in over 60 years. The landmark exhibition will bring together masterpieces from The Courtauld Gallery alongside works formerly in Courtauld's collection and now dispersed internationally. It will be a unique opportunity to enjoy some of the greatest modern French paintings of the 19th century and will shed light on Courtauld's pioneering role in shaping public taste for Impressionism in the United Kingdom.
    The lavishly illustrated catalogue presents new research on the personality of Samuel Courtauld as well as his taste, collecting habits and wide-ranging philanthropy.
    It also explores afresh his network of dealers and places him within the wider context of contemporary collectors of Impressionism throughout Europe and the United States. The exhibition features almost a hundred works, each given its own entry and enhanced with close-up images and comparative illustrations to provide an in-depth exploration of this extraordinary collection.

  • One of the masterpieces of The Courtauld Gallery's collection of Spanish drawings is a sheet known as Cantar y bailar (Singing and dancing), page 3 from Goya's Album D, also known as the 'Witches and Old Women' album.
    Bringing together all the extant album pages, currently numbered up to 23, this catalogue proposes a reconstruction of the album that would include the sheets from which Goya's page numbers have been erased or trimmed away.
    Goya began to create 'journal albums' of drawings relatively late in life, after the shattering illness that left him stone deaf before the age of fifty. It was a practice he would sustain until his death, creating eight albums (named with letters A to H) that originally included a total of some 550 drawings. Visually, technically and intellectually coherent, these albums are unified in their discrete techniques and types of support, and paginated (after the first). In these album pages Goya committed to paper his views, with or without written comments, on human nature and the world around him. Each album has its own distinctive subject matter, style and technique.
    The later history of the eight albums, already expertly chronicled, remains under investigation. The disbound album sheets were remounted in large volumes by Goya's son, then sold en bloc by his grandson. Following their final dispersal by Federico de Madrazo and Valentín Carderera in the 1860s and 1870s, many gaps remain in all the albums.
    This exhibition and the research underpinning it on Album D are the pilot for an international project for the reconstruction of Goya's graphic oeuvre. The publication will test the extent of Album D and explore the possible sequence and thematic coherence of the sheets. The individual Album D drawings will be reproduced as a proposed reconstructed sequence, each with detailed catalogue entry and technical information. In addition, the publication will define the context of the album by including a number of closely related works by Goya.

  • Accompanying a major scholarly exhibition at The Courtauld Gallery, this book explores one of the most beautiful and enigmatic objects in The Courtauld's collection: the so-called 'Courtauld wallet', a brass container richly inlaid with gold and silver, imitating a lady's textile or leather bag, and probably made in Mosul in northern Iraq around 1300.
    No other object of this kind is known. Decorated all round with courtly figures and on the top with an elaborate banqueting scene featuring an enthroned couple, it has long been recognised as a masterpiece of Arab metalwork. Yet, despite the superb quality of its design and craftsmanship and its status as a unique object, this exceptional metalwork bag has never been properly published. Thus it remains little known outside a small circle of specialists, and little understood even within that circle.
    Encompassing a variety of multidisciplinary essays by distinguished historians and art historians - on subjects ranging from music at the Mongol court, Mosul under Mongol governorship and Mongol marriage customs to the role of women under the Ilkhanids -this publication aims to explore the origins, function and iconography of this splendid luxury object as well as the cultural context in which it was made and used. It will bring together other images of enthroned Mongols with female consorts, as well as scenes of hunters, revellers and musicians in a variety of media, including illustrated manuscripts, ceramics, textile, and metalwork.
    By presenting the bag alongside carefully selected contemporary material, it will provide an insight into courtly life under the Mongols in the newly conquered areas of their empire, and will also provide an unrivalled opportunity to investigate the inlaid brass tradition in Mosul after the Mongol Conquest. Objects made before and after this seismic event will be reproduced side by side to demonstrate how the Mosul metalworkers adapted their work for their new patrons.

  • At Stowe, 250 acres of parkland off er a complex web of views, pathways, statues, inscriptions, urns and ideas. Unlike its French fl oricultural precursors, Stowe presents sudden shifts of scene, abrupt revelations, as well as spots at which to stop to absorb the visual eff ect. There is natural beauty in the gardens of Stowe, but they serve a larger purpose than to please the eye. Beneath this facade of bucolic idyll lies a deeply important suggestion of man's relationship to nature.
    Accompanying an exhibition of historic and contemporary art at Stowe House, The Garden at War explores the gardens at Stowe, built by a general, as a site of perpetual confl ict in which the preconditions of destruction and creation are inescapable. If nature is understood to be original, then the garden is an ordered but un-orderly condition; a re-ordered vision of the natural order, a vision of nature disciplined by human action in a attempt to advance and yield control.
    Starting with works by the preeminent neoclassical painters Nicolas Poussin and Claude Lorrain - whose distinct pictorial visions gave rise to an unmistakable relationship between the garden, the viewer and the natural world - the publication brings together an arrangement of interpretations and theories exploring metaphors and meanings within the very practice of gardening itself. An introduction by the pre-eminent critic Stephen Bann and an essay by the foremost garden historian John Dixon Hunt lead on to newly commissioned illustrations by artist Gary Hincks, a previously unpublished interview with the Scottish conceptual artist and gardener Ian Hamilton Finlay, and a new discussion of confl ict in the work of Richard Long.

  • Published to commemorate the 500th anniversary of the birth of celebrated Portuguese Renaissance court painter, architect and essayist Francisco de Holanda, On Portraiture brings back into circulation the earliest ever treatise dedicated to portraiture. This is the first published English translation.

  • In 1730-31, Tiepolo undertook his fi rst signifi cant project outside the Veneto, frescoes for fi ve ceilings in Palazzo Archinto in Milan. The paintings were commissioned by Count Carlo Archinto (1670-1732), likely in honor of the marriage of his son, Filippo, to Giulia Borromeo. Tiepolo's mythological and allegorical scenes-Triumph of Arts and Sciences; Apollo and Phaëton; Perseus and Andromeda; Juno, Fortune, and Venus; and Nobility-were painted in some of the largest rooms of the palazzo. Unfortunately, the palazzo was bombed during World War II and its interior completely destroyed.
    Only a series of black-and-white photographs, taken between 1897 and the late 1930s, preserves the frescoes' appearance, but a number of preparatory drawings and paintings provide precious information, including: three painted sketches (Triumph of Arts and Sciences, the Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, Lisbon; Apollo and Phaëton, Los Angeles County Museum; and Perseus and Andromeda, The Frick Collection). Three drawings from the British Museum in London, the Museo Civico in Trieste, and the Sinebrychoff Art Museum in Helsinki, are the only related graphic works. These- along with other drawings and prints by Tiepolo and some books- have been reunited for the fi rst time in order to bring to life these extraordinary works of art.
    On view at The Frick Collection from April 16 to July 14, 2019, the exhibition is curated by Xavier F. Salomon, Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator at the Frick, with Andrea Tomezzoli, Professor at the University of Padua, and Denis Ton, Curator of the Musei Civici in Belluno. Included in the publication are essays on Tiepolo's work in Palazzo Archinto (Salomon), on the role of the frescoes in Tiepolo's career (Tomezzoli), on the intellectual world of the Archinto family (Ton), and on the architectural history of the palace (Kluzer).

  • The self-portrait of Baccio Bandinelli in the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston, shows the sculptor pointing not to a work of marble or bronze, but to a drawing.
    Bandinelli was particularly proud of his skills as a draughtsman, and he was prolific in his production of works on paper. This set him apart from contemporaries in his profession;
    Many Renaissance sculptors left us no drawings at all. Accompanying an exhibition at the Gardner Museum, this publication will put Bandinelli's portrait in context by looking at the practice of drawing by sculptors from the Renaissance to the Baroque in Central Italy.
    A focus of the book will be Bandinelli's own drawings and the development of his practice across his career and his experimentation with different media. Bandinelli's drawings will be compared with those of Michelangelo and Cellini. The broader question considered, however, is when, how and why sculptors drew. Every Renaissance sculptor who set out to make a work in metal or stone would first have made a series of preparatory models in wax, clay and/or stucco. Drawing was not an essential practice for sculptors in the way it was for painters, and indeed, most surviving sculptors' drawings are not preparatory studies for works they subsequently executed in three dimensions.
    By comparing both rough sketches and more finished drawings with related threedimensional works by the same artists, the importance of drawing for various individual sculptors will be examined.
    When sculptors did draw, it often indicated something about the artist's training or about his ambitions. Among the most accomplished draftsmen were artists like Pollaiuolo, Verrocchio and Cellini, who had come to sculpture by way of goldsmithery, a profession that required proficiency in ornamental design. Artists who sought to become architects, meanwhile - the likes of Michelangelo, Giambologna and Ammanati - similarly needed to learn to draw, since architects had to provide plans, elevations and other drawings to assistants and clients and had to imagine the place of individual figures within a larger multi-media ensemble. Certain kinds of projects, moreover - fountains and tombs, for example - required drawings to a degree that others did not. Sections on the Renaissance goldsmith-sculptor and sculptor-architect will allow comparison of the place drawing had in various artists' careers.
    Beginning with a chapter dedicated to the importance of draftsmanship in the education of sculptors, showing works by Finiguerra, Cellini Bandinelli and Giambologna, the book will be split up into chapters dealing with the various challenges sculptors faced while drawing objects in the round, reliefs, and architectural structures. A central section will focus on Bandinelli, demonstrating the importance drawing held for him while he was preparing sculptures and as an independent token of his artistry.

  • This richly illustrated and beautifully produced scholarly catalogue of the superlative collection of Renaissance and Baroque bronze figurative statuettes from the Hill Collection, accompanies an exhibition of the collection at The Frick Collection, New York opening late January 2014.
    Spanning from 1470-1740, the bronzes presented are of exceptional quality and exemplify the development of bronze statuettes from 1470 in Renaissance Italy to their dissemination across the artistic centres of Europe. The Hill Collection is distinguished by rare, autograph masterpieces by Italian sculptors such as Andrea Riccio and Giambologna, and has the most important collection of Baroque bronzes by Giuseppe Piamontini in the world. Its holdings of works by Giambologna and his school is the strongest found in any single collection, with the sole exception of the Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence, and evokes the splendour of the late Renaissance courts, while the richness of the international Baroque is represented by religious themes by Alessandro Algardi, northern bronzes by Adriaen de Vries and Hubert Gerhard, and a remarkable assemblage of French 116th-and early 17thcentury bronzes in the classical mode, by Barthélemy Prieur and from the circle of Ponce Jacquiot.
    The Hill Collection reveals the range of artistry, invention and technical refinement characteristic of sculptures created when the tradition of the European statuette was at its height.
    The catalogue includes detailed biographies of each of the artists represented, and is introduced with essays by the distinguished authors. Patricia Wengraf is one of the world's leading dealers in bronzes, sculpture and works of art, and in her particular speciality, bronzes of the 15th-18th centuries, her knowledge and connoisseurship are of world repute. Denise Allen is Curator of Renaissance Paintings and Sculpture at the Frick Collection. Claudia Kryza-Gersch, formerly Kunstkammer, Vienna, is an independent scholar renowned for her studies of North Italian bronzes of the 16th and 17th centuries. Dimitrios Zikos, Florence, an independent scholar is renowned for his knowledge of the Florentine archives from c. 1550-1740, he has curated many exhibitions at the Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence.

  • When English naturalist Joseph Banks (1743-1820) accompanied Captain James Cook (1728-1779) on his historic mission into the Pacifi c, the Endeavour voyage of 1768-1771, he took with him a team of collectors and illustrators. They returned with unprecedented collections of artefacts and specimens of stunning birds, fi sh and other animals as well as thousands of plants, most seen for the fi rst time in Europe.
    They produced, too, remarkable landscape and fi gure drawings of the peoples encountered on the voyage along with detailed journals and descriptions of the places visited, which, with the fi rst detailed maps of these lands (Tahiti, New Zealand and the East Coast of Australia), were afterwards used to create lavishly illustrated accounts of the mission. These caused a storm of interest in Europe where plays, poems and satirical caricatures were also produced to celebrate and examine the voyage, its personnel and many 'new' discoveries.
    Along with contemporary portraits of key personalities aboard the ship, scale models and plans of the ship itself, scientifi c instruments taken on the voyage, commemorative medals and sketches, the objects (over 140) featured in this new book will tell the story of the Endeavour voyage and its impact ahead of the 250th anniversary in 2018 of the launch of this seminal mission.Artwork made both during and after the voyage will be seen alongside actual specimens. And by comparing the voyage originals with the often stylized engravings later produced in London for the offi cial account, the book will investigate how knowledge gained on the mission was gathered, revised and later received in Europe. Items separated in some cases for more than two centuries will be brought together to reveal their fascinating history not only during but since that mission. Original voyage specimens will feature together with illustrations and descriptions of them, showing a rich diversity of newly discovered species and how Banks organized this material, planning but ultimately failing to publish it. In fact, many of the objects in the book have never been published before.
    The book will focus on the contribution of Banks's often neglected artists - Sydney Parkinson, Herman Diedrich Spöring, Alexander Buchan as well as the priest Tupaia, who joined Endeavour in the Society Islands - none of whom survived the mission. These men illustrated island scenes of bays, dwellings, canoes as well as the dress, faces, possessions and ceremonies of Pacifi c peoples. Of particular interest, and only recently recognised as by him, are the original artworks of Tupaia, who produced as part of this mission the fi rst charts and illustrations on paper by any Polynesian. The surviving Endeavour voyage illustrations are the most important body of images produced since Europeans entered this region, matching the truly historic value of the plant specimens and artefacts that will be seen alongside them.

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